Saints of New York

Saturday, October 8, 2016

Loreto Theater


Timothy Cardinal Dolan, Archbishop of New York
Br. Tyrone A.Davis, C.F.C, Executive Director, Office of Black Ministry, Archdiocese of New York
George Horton, Dorothy Day Guild

David DiCerto, Moderator

 

New York City is the cultural and finacial capital of the world, but perhaps its greatest boast is the number of men and women recognized by the Catholic Church as saints, who have called the city home. Join His Eminence, Timothy Cardinal Dolan and other special guests for a conversation on these remarkable figures -- including Dorothy Day, Pierre Toussaint and Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen -- and why they are relevant to us today.

Dorothy Day is pictured with children in an undated photo. Co-founder of the Catholic Worker Movement and candidate for sainthood, Day was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., in 1897, and died at the Catholic Worker's Maryhouse in New York in 1980. She was a self-proclaimed anarchist, a crusader of Catholic social teaching in aiding the poor and mentally ill people, a strict pacifist and a labor union supporter. (CNS photo/courtesy of Marquette University archives) (Dec. 21, 2012) See DAY-LIFE and DAY-SAINT Dec. 21, 2012.

Dorothy Day is pictured with children in an undated photo. Co-founder of the Catholic Worker Movement and candidate for sainthood, Day was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., in 1897, and died at the Catholic Worker's Maryhouse in New York in 1980. She was a self-proclaimed anarchist, a crusader of Catholic social teaching in aiding the poor and mentally ill people, a strict pacifist and a labor union supporter. (CNS photo/courtesy of Marquette University archives)

Admission Free