The Sheen Center Presents:

People Doing Math Live!

Friday, August 19, 2016

Black Box Theater

11051750_1166042250077933_2857284380539566037_n

Photo by Gabrielle Purchong

After sold out shows at The Public Theater’s Under the Radar Festival, Strand Bookstore, and most recently The National Museum of Mathematics, People Doing Math Live! comes to the Sheen Center for Thought and Culture for two very special performances. People Doing Math Live! is the live component of People Doing Math, a serialized podcast about math, art and everyday life. An irreverent mash-up of Mathletics and RadioLab, People Doing Math Live! is an unabashed celebration of the beauty, uncertainty, and wonder of exploring a world expressed in numbers.

Hosts Andrew Scoville, Joe Drymala, and Dave Tennent record an unabridged episode while interacting with a live studio audience. The show often features dunce caps, libations, special guests, daring feats of math, music and new radio drama by Jaclyn Backhaus. Featuring special guest Nick Rauh, Chief of Mathematics from America's only Museum of Math (momath.org), joins us to keep the math on track!

July's episode will focus on GRIDS and ask the question how has this simple structure contributed to breakthroughs in mathematics, computer programming and music composition?

August's episode will feature famous mathematician GALILEO and will ask the question: what is the role of the mathematician in society and how can they live their truths when they defy "common sense."

 


The team behind People Doing Math is group of NYC based theater artists who are interested in the intersection between science and art. The podcast was born from common frustrations with how math is perceived by everyday Americans. The core group of PDM is comprised of composers, political speech writers, technologists, video designers, directors and writers. We are united by our common belief that math is an innately human experience and everyone should be encouraged to add their voice to the conversation, even people who are not “good at math.”